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Friday, June 30, 2017

Book World Should Prevail Over Bitcoin Economy



There are wealthy speculators who are banking on the Bitcoin to become a real currency, perhaps a global one that replaces all currencies.  This would be a huge mistake and lead to horrific economic consequences.  But while the commoditization of a made-up digital jewel gets traded at nearly $3000 a coin, the real economy of books remains steady, but slow-growing.  It just doesn’t seem fair.

The book world, to a degree, reflects the rest of the world’s economy.  Books can be produced digitally or on paper.  They can be sold from a brick-and-mortar store or ordered online.  They can be manufactured by a large corporation, a smaller company or an individual.  Many products or services are created or sold in a similar manner.

But the Bitcoin represents the worst of all worlds.  It is something that no single government can control nor can its existence be verified.  It’s all online, through some mysterious codes and algorithms.  Who is to say how many Bitcoins actually exist?  How do we know the system hasn’t been hacked?  It’s all run under a shroud of mystery.

A Bitcoin, to me, is useless.  It has no intrinsic value and the marketplace just speculates and bids it up too wildly or bids it down with fast, huge drops.  There’s no rhyme or reason to it.  There are no sound economics attached to it, yet some are looking to invest huge sums into it.  Why?

The book economy represents good old values.  Hard work, creativity, and resourcefulness can lead to a profit.  There’s something tangible to it – we can see it, touch it, and understand it.  There’s something measurable and comparative at work here.  A Bitcoin is one part Mafia-controlled craps tables, one-part fixed horse racing.  There’s no honor, truth, or value to the Bitcoin.

Nations should outlaw the Bitcoin and arrest these scammers.  It is not in humanity’s interest to have a single currency that is solely digital and unaccounted for.  It’s not fair to the book market or any industry, where people actually work hard for a living, to just let people gamble on some type of pyramid-scheme fling.

The book world runs with a bit of honor, whereas the Bitcoin industry seems like it only exists to make money without substantive reason.  Books have a value and they spew values.  Bitcoins are almost not real and yet some people will pay thousands for one.  The world’s upside down.

The world has always been this way. Wall Street makes money from money, while the rest of the world has to earn its way.  One may not think to pit Bitcoins vs. books, but think about this:  Two opposites, co-existing in a single world.  Which one do you hold in higher esteem?

Recent Posts

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Interview with best-selling author Tess Gerritsen

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An author primer on how the news media works

10 Lessons For Authors-Turned-Bloggers

12 Big Threats to Free Speech

Can you market your book for five minutes a day?

Does Your Subject Line Stink?

Should authors Use Twitter or Facebook?

Do You Promote Your Book Outrageously?

Your 2017 Complete Author Book Marketing & PR Toolkit

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs 


Thursday, June 29, 2017

The Education Of Marketing Books



It is not lost on me that I get paid to, in part, read books and learn about the world.  Sure, I actually get compensated to promote books to the media and develop author brands, but along the way I come across knowledge, experiences, and ideas from a wide variety of books and author discussions.

Promoting books and authors is far more rewarding and interesting than calling upon my marketing skills to hawk products and services of big corporations.  Do I really want to peddle some useless widget or the latest model of an SUV?  Will I feel like I’m serving a higher purpose by making sure a food chain gets some media coverage for introducing a new doughnut?

When marketing books it is a similar feeling to promoting a non-profit.  There’s a higher purpose involved.  I feel like I make the world better when informing them of positive messages, empowering visions, and the transferring of knowledge.  Not all books are important or even entertaining, but promoting words, ideas, and human experiences is such a wonderful and useful experience.  No one’s life is changed by hearing about a commercial product, but many people may act or think differently after hearing about a book or heeding an author’s advice.

Sometimes I worked with authors who turned out to not be so interesting, helpful, or even truthful.  Not all authors are good people nor are their books useful.  But that’s life -- there is good and bad in every field.

Some of the authors I’ve worked with – and the sum exceeds well over a thousand – have inspired me, made me think differently, helped me change a habit or encouraged me to do better, be more and become whom I was meant to be.  I’ve been given guidance on diet, healthcare, finances, legal matters, parenting, coaching, travel, communicating, home buying, grieving, relationships, sex, religion, politics, and just about every aspect of life.  What a wonderful way to earn a degree in living!

Of course, it’s a two-way street.  I’d like to think I imparted wisdom-- about life and book publicity – to all of those whom I’ve helped over the years.  We learned from each other and grew wiser for it.  Life’s about the people you meet, the experiences you have, the books you read, and the flow of your imagination.  By working with writers,  I’ve been able to give and receive simultaneously.


Recent Posts

What Does It Really Take To Hit A Best-Seller List?

10 Ways To Effectively Approach Book Publicity

Why do some authors refuse to pursue achievable and productive media coverage?

Interview with best-selling author Tess Gerritsen

These are the choices authors must make

An author primer on how the news media works

10 Lessons For Authors-Turned-Bloggers

12 Big Threats to Free Speech

Can you market your book for five minutes a day?

Does Your Subject Line Stink?

Should authors Use Twitter or Facebook?

Do You Promote Your Book Outrageously?

Your 2017 Complete Author Book Marketing & PR Toolkit

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs 


Friday, June 23, 2017

How Writers & Book Publishers Should Work Their Network



Here are 11 tips for authors, publishers, book promoters and marketers to utilize to become a powerful network in a networked society:

1.      Decide to make networking a part of your everyday life.  Commit to it mentally and time-wise. Visualize the benefits of networking and align your actions and communications with the goal to build up a quality network of connections.

2.      Provide your contacts through social media good value, offering guidance, direction, resources, or a genuine offer to help them.  They should return the favor.

3.      Where possible, move to face-to-face contact with your network.  That is the best way to make a true human connection.  The phone is next best -- or Skype.  Email or online interactions may be convenient, but they lack sound or physical presence.

4.      Researchers show that although on average we might meet 200-1000 people a year, we can only handle some 150 contacts.  The rest fall through the cracks.  Choose your relationships carefully and see which ones are worth nurturing.

5.      Have a clear vision of what you want to achieve with the people you network with.  Many contacts may not be able to help you directly, but they can lead you to those who will help.  At the very least, they may offer information, advice, and emotional support or encouragement.

6.      Always realize that you are responsible for the message others receive from or about you.  How do you brand or positon yourself?  Are you giving clear explanation of who you are, what you do, who you know?  Do you offer clear stories, narratives, or examples of what you’ve accomplished?

7.      Do you give off a positive vibe, an inviting or helpful feeling?  Are you friendly and approachable? Are you a good listener and do you ask questions that not only inform you but show you have a genuine interest in them?

8.      What value do you claim to offer others?  Is it your experience or current job?  Is it your knowledge and professionalism?  Is it your personality?  Or is it the size and quality of your network?

9.      Do you radiate negative energy?  No one wants to be near a needy person.  Are you a Debbie Downer?  Remain positive, optimistic, smile and laugh.

10.  Develop an empowering 15-second elevator speech about who you are.  Share it with everyone.

11.  Find model networkers and analyze what’s so appealing about them.  How do they approach conversations? What do they say or offer? How do they follow up with those they meet? How do they dress or sound? What’s their body language, voice, or intensity like?  What kind of vocabulary level do they employ?

The key to networking is to come across as being genuinely helpful while you are really focused on finding others to give you what you need.  This requires research, communication, luck and sustained effort.  Put yourself out there – join groups and attend events.  Take a leadership positon with some groups.

Always think long-term and short-term.  Think of your goals and whom could help you.  Seek them out. Be assertive. Look to make the right connections and be prepared to give something to get something.

You don’t necessarily need to know a lot of people, just the right ones.  But you need more than a surface connection.  You need to develop a relationship that yields results.

The good news is it’s easier than ever to network.  You can research those you want to meet. You can find ways online to introduce yourself.  Then follow-up with a call or in-person meeting.  It’s like dating.  Tomorrow you may meet Mr. or Mrs. Right.  Not everyone will be your soul mate, but it just takes a few good people to get you where you want to be.

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http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2017/06/how-can-authors-make-use-of-their.html

10 Ways To Effectively Approach Book Publicity

What Does It Really Take To Hit A Best-Seller List?

Trends in book sales influence how authors handle marketplace

Why do some authors refuse to pursue achievable and productive media coverage?

Do you take responsibility for your book PR?

10 Lessons For Authors-Turned-Bloggers

12 Big Threats to Free Speech

These are the choices authors must make

An author primer on how the news media works

Can you market your book for five minutes a day?

Does Your Subject Line Stink?

Should authors Use Twitter or Facebook?

How Big Book Marketing Comes From Small Things

Do You Promote Your Book Outrageously?

Your 2017 Complete Author Book Marketing & PR Toolkit


Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs 

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Books For A Better World


I have known for some time that the world looks better on paper. Words, arranged in such a way, can heal in a way where nothing else can. Words, when positioned just right, can take us to places that don't exist, perhaps to places that never existed or could ever be. Books transport us to envision an ideal that for whatever reason escapes our ability to live it.

I awoke from a nightmare one recent Sunday morning reminding myself of a feeling or conclusion that I rarely allow into my head or to enter my thinking but it's truthfulness invaded every fiber of my being. The thoughts invaded my existence and engulfed my consciousness: The world is a dangerous, violent place and it makes me feel helpless.

It may have been a combination of hearing about more terrorist attacks in London or my visit to a marginal neighborhood the day before, but I had bad thoughts swirling in my head. There are some people, intent on doing bad things, that simply can't be stopped. The police can't be everywhere and the criminal intention of everyone can't always be known.

I am the person who believes the world can live in harmony and find a way to share life peacefully but I am not ignorant to the fact that there is a cycle of violence that repeats itself in every generation. Poverty, mental illness and revenge will always exist and as a result we are left with people who will do us harm. Then add terrorism to the mix. We have nation-on-nation wars over politics, religion, or resources. The planet racks up a lot of broken bodies and hearts every single day.

I don't want to be bleak here, and for many of us, we hope to never be the victims of violence, but all too often millions of people are assaulted sexually. Others are randomly punched, stabbed or shot, for reasons ranging from robbery, prejudice, insanity, fun, or ego. We have a long list of enemies and people we would like to smack the shit out of.  Most of us don't act on those impulses to strike out at others, but too many will let the blood flow into their  engorged fists and let their undeniable rage burst without restraint or question.

Can books shape a better world and get people like me to see hope, to find redemption in a humanity that all too often brutalizes others? Can we use poetry, novels, and non-fiction to not only make us feel better but to actually help change the world for the better?

Books can make us feel good, if not distracted, but can they cure our social ills, especially when it comes to violence? Could books even be harming us?

Books can do harm when they ignore the truths that we need to confront, snd instead focus attention on less important things.

Books can mess with us when they spew lies, misinformation, hatred, and a dogma that inspires violence.

Books can separate us and leave us less united when they call for groups of people to be allegiant to a warped outlook on life.

I believe books have an obligation to do no harm and to do more than snestesize us from life's cruelties and shortcomings. Books need to help, heal, and harmonize. They need to resolve issues, solve problems, and fix what is broken. Perhaps I burden authors and publishers but I believe the real purpose of books is to in fact have a purpose and that is to contribute to creating a better and safer world.

This is the challenge of our times.

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs 

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Good Book Publicity Is A Marathon Not A Sprint




Book publicity is more of a marathon than a sprint, yet some authors and publishers approach it all wrong.  A short-term approach is limiting and harmful and should be avoided at all costs.

To promote a book appropriately, effectively and with your author brand in mind, plan for a real marathon. 

At least six months prior to your book’s release date, complete your website, fill out your profiles on all major social media platforms, and create your press kit materials.  Begin the process of securing speaking engagements.

Around four months before your book’s scheduled publication date, send out advance review copies to the news media, especially key book publishing magazines, book reviewers, major morning TV shows, and to those whom you seek to get testimonials or endorsements from.

Along the way you’ll reach out to your network of connections to drum up pre-sales.  As you get closer to the launching of your book, you’ll be in touch with other media – TV, radio, print and digital.  This will continue for at least three months past the publication date.

That’s a nine-month marketing campaign, similar in duration to a pregnancy.  Indeed, promoting a book is like giving birth to your ideas.

There are no short cuts or a one-time burst of activity that nets you all of the publicity and marketing needed to be really successful.  So when people get impatient or think they should be in The New York Times or on The View after two weeks of pitching the media, they need to step back and gain a big-picture perspective.

A PR campaign, over time, unfolds with some unique opportunities.  For one, you pitch through several different news cycles and pitching climates.  If you only shoot for the stars for a short period of time, you have fewer chances, so connect to what the news is covering at that moment.

Secondly, over time, you change pitches and test out numerous angles.  In a short-term campaign you don’t get to try so many pitches out.

Third, as you build up your media resume over time, you can show clips and links and reference these media hits to generate even more media interest. In a short campaign, you don’t get to use as many clips for as long a period.

Fourth, you simply need time reaching out to the media following up with them, sending books out, giving them time to read it and then seeing if you came along at the right time for the media to cover your topic.  In a short campaign, you lack time for the natural back-and-forth between authors and the media.

Lastly, over time, you may rack up some awards, land an impressive endorsement, or generate some large sales or maybe even hit a best-seller list.  You can leverage this news by incorporating it into your media solicitations, but in a short-term campaign you typically lack time to gain traction in these areas.

Even though our society is more impatient than ever and news cycles shrink from 24 hours to the speed of a Tweet, authors and publishers must take a well-calibrated approach to book marketing and media campaign.  If you obsess over getting immediate results you will put at risk the long term gains that could be generated with a more thorough, consistent and well-paced approach.

I understand the idea we must act with immediacy and a sense of urgency -- which is good to get the blood flowing – but we have to let things unfold at the proper time or we’ll be left with feelings of anger, frustration, and loss.

Have a long-term strategy and seek results on a regular basis over a sustained period of time. It’s a marathon, not a sprint!

Recent Posts
How can authors make good use of their network to sell books?

10 Ways To Effectively Approach Book Publicity

What Does It Really Take To Hit A Best-Seller List?

Trends in book sales influence how authors handle marketplace

Why do some authors refuse to pursue achievable and productive media coverage?

10 Lessons For Authors-Turned-Bloggers

12 Big Threats to Free Speech

These are the choices authors must make

An author primer on how the news media works

Can you market your book for five minutes a day?

Does Your Subject Line Stink?

Should authors Use Twitter or Facebook?

How Big Book Marketing Comes From Small Things

Do You Promote Your Book Outrageously?

Do You Support The Bookism Movement?

What Color Is Your Book Marketing Parachute?

Your 2017 Complete Author Book Marketing & PR Toolkit


Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs 

Friday, June 16, 2017

Advice You Won’t Find In A Book This Father’s Day



There are many books on fatherhood, though far fewer than on motherhood. And there are many, many books on parenting, from the classics to the newest installments.  The biggest book I ever promoted on the subject, Scream-Free Parenting by Hal Runkel, should be read by everyone raising a child.  But there’s no secret sauce to any single book on being a dad.

Being a father is something that comes from personal experience.  How does your wife parent?  What kind of kid do you have?  How old were you when you became a dad?  How many resources – parents, friends, nanny, money – do you have?  All of these factor in to what kind of dad you’ll be.  But probably the biggest indicator of what type of dad you’ll be comes from your perception of what your own dad was like when he raised you.

As this Father’s Day approaches – and the one-year anniversary of when my dad passed away (June 2nd) – I want to reflect on who he was.  After all, he helped form the person I’ve become and the dad that I am to my two children, ages 12 and 9. With this salute to my father, I hope you pick up a few tips on how to be a dad and live your life.

My fondest memories come from our experiences with baseball. From ages 10-15. I played six years of Little League.  My father either managed or coached me on all of these teams.  We won a championship in our first season and then went on to lose more games than we won, but it was a lot of fun.

He used to take in some of my suggestions about where to bat or play kids in the field.  He didn’t drive, so we ended up lugging the equipment bags about a mile and a half, from an apartment building to Marine Park in Brooklyn.  He was a stickler for getting to the games way in advance.  Sometimes for a 9:00 am game we were out of the house by 7 or so.  I still had sleep in in my eyes but he was raring to go.  He loved the competition as much as a kid.  He also liked teaching the kids.

As a boy growing up in 1940s and 1950s Williamsburg, Brooklyn, he played every kind of ballgame possible, often with his twin brother, Burt.  He told me they played punchball, stickball, and any game that called upon a Spalding ball.  They didn’t play organized sports on well-manicured suburban fields.  They lived on the streets, playing even as the sun set during hot summers.  Their camp was whatever they and kids from the neighborhood determined would entertain them.

When he wasn’t playing ball he was listening to Brooklyn Dodger games on the radio.  He and his brother loved Gil Hodges and Duke Snider.  His heart was broken when the team moved for greater riches in L.A. but five years later when the Mets were born in 1962 he became a dedicated fan and raised my sister and me to worship the lovable losers.

My dad and I went on to coach baseball teams for several seasons once I aged out as a player.  When I played for Baruch College my freshman year I would join my dad, where possible, to coach 11- and 12 year-old-boys who loved baseball.

One day my dad got thrown out of the game for arguing with the umpire.  My dad would never argue with anyone over anything but on the baseball field he would voice his views and wear his heart on his sleeve.  That same game, after I took over as manager, I, too, got thrown out for arguing.  It was my proudest moment.

My dad had sympathy for umpires. He tried umpiring for a few seasons. He was terrible at it, but he tried his best.  One game he sounded unsure of the call and blurted out:  “He’s out, right?”  The worst thing you can do is come off as insecure as an umpire.  The team his ruling came against stormed off the field, shocked at how wrong they thought the call was.  The manager of that team was supposed to drive us home (I was playing in the game).  Needless to say, his anger over the call overflowed and he left us stranded at the field.

Once I went off to college, transferring to Albany State, he formed his own non-profit youth baseball program. 

He funded, with a $500 grant from his employer, Merrill Lynch, a program that lasted several seasons.  He fielded two teams of kids who came from poor homes.  He didn’t charge a fee and supplied uniforms, equipment and instruction.  Most of the time the teams played each other but I think they may have played games against other leagues, too.

As much as he loved baseball, he adored music from the golden era of the 1950’s.  In fact, he used to sing songs like “You cheated, you lied, you said that you loved me” when he’d coach or if he joined me in some schoolyard stickball games against other kids and their dads.

He worked with the Police Benevolent Association to place a patch on the uniform sleeves of his players, to honor a slain police officer, Ed Byrne.  Builders Baseball was his own league and he was proud to have started it, but he realized it was too much for one person to keep up.

My dad was a friend growing up.  He spent endless hours talking to me, sharing views on politics, philosophy and ordinary life.  He was active in the anti-war movement during the Vietnam War.  He even formed a group called WPA-World Peace Association.  He wanted for nothing more than for his children to grow up in a world without war.  He never thought violence solved anything and always taught us not to fight.  He didn’t believe in corporal punishment either.

His conversations on our many walks spurred my curiosities.  He allowed me to question everything.  I adopted his views on peace and about everyone’s role in making the world a better place.  He would rarely speak up for himself but he tirelessly advocated for others.  He was a big proponent of civil rights and social justice.  He marched against the war and for equal rights.  He later would protest new wars in the Middle East, championed gay rights, and stood up to protect the mentally ill.  He wrote countless letters to Congress, the president, and had his fair share published in the New York Daily News and other papers.  He even ran for State Assembly in New York as an independent while in his early 70’s.  I think he got nine votes but it didn’t matter.  He was speaking out for the disenfranchised and gave voice to the matters of importance.

He was a loving, family-centric, caring father.  He taught me to use my words, not my fists.  He encouraged me to become an avid writer and I ended up taking up his goal of becoming a writer.

He was a conscientious worker especially in his 30 years at what was then the nation's leading stock brokerage.  He rarely took a sick day, and if he did it was because he was actually sick.  Even during an MTA strike that stopped mass transportation. he found a way to get in.  He walked over the Brooklyn Bridge and got to work on foot.

Never short on doling out hugs or telling us he loved us, he was happy if his family was happy.

One of my proudest moments of him was when he decided to go back to college, more than 50 years after he had left with two years under his belt.  He got a job to support his family back then.  But when, in his mid – 70s, he started taking courses at a community college and later at Brooklyn College, he was thriving. He loved to learn and he really wanted to get a diploma.

He had a good sense of humor, often a self-deprecating one.  He’d laugh so hard at times that it was infectious.  He wasn’t a real joke-teller, but he enjoyed a good sarcastic comment.  Even if he was the punchline to his own joke, he enjoyed a good laugh.

Loyalty was never an issue for him.  He was married for 54 years.  He worked at one place for three decades. He lived in the same apartment for almost 50 years.  He was a member of a lodge, Knights of Pythias, for over a half-century.  He lived his entire life in Brooklyn.

A person’s worth is measured in moments -- and in memories – and their legacy from their words and deeds. 

He always told me as a kid that I’d become a great parent.  I swore to him I’d repay him by raising my kids right.  I I hope I am honoring him this way. 

There’s no proper way to conclude a life or the discussion of one’s existence.  The values he installed in others are his epitaph.  His love to me and others are his legacy.  Our memories of him are his gift.

The circle of life now comes as I raise my children.  Only now do I understand who my father was as I become a dad to my children.  I hope to repay his patience, support, and kindness in the way I bring my kids up.

He used to be early to everything.  He would sometimes, show up an hour ahead of schedule.  He used to say that on-time is late.  Well, Dad, your passing came too early and it’s the one time I wish you were late.

Happy Father’s Day to all of the men who do their best to raise the next generation.  We can all learn something from Allan Feinblum. I know I did.

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs 

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Authors Don’t Need To Panic When Talking To The Media



As a writer, you must overcome many obstacles.  You write a book that’s worth publishing.  You find a literary agent, book publisher, or self-publishing platform.  You market and promote the book. Then, opportunity knocks, and the news media wants to interview you.  Finally, your moment has arrived.  But with it also comes pangs of fear, feelings of insecurity and even a touch of panic.

Hold on.  There’s every reason to feel nervous, that’s natural, and the adrenaline rush can even help you.  But there’s no reason to have an allergic reaction to the media.  It all comes down to you talking about yourself and your book – two subjects you know better than anyone.  You should not fret.  Have fun with it.

The reasons people freak out may consist of the following:

1.      What if people reject me or my book?
2.      What if I don’t say the right thing, or worse, say the wrong thing?
3.      I’m insecure about my looks or my voice – can I hide?
4.      I fear what they’ll ask me or that I’ll be surprised.
5.      I desperately want to make a great impression but don’t know how.
6.      I don’t know how to speak in sound bytes.
7.      I’ve never done this before, so I have no clue what to expect.
8.      What if the media wants to make me look stupid?
9.      What exactly should I say that will lure interest in me?
10.  I’m not a big public speaker.  I would rather write than talk.

It’s quite normal to think of any and all of these things.  But I can assure you these can all be addressed.

The first step is to reverse your thinking.  Instead of thinking of the negatives, think of the positives.  Finally, you get to have your message heard, your views voiced, and your book discovered.  Simply choose to see this as a wonderful opportunity with no drawbacks or risks.

Second, to alleviate your concerns or fears, go through media training.  Have a professional help you.

Third, write up 12-15 suggested interview questions and share them with media outlets.  They are likely to use it as a script for the interview, which helps you anticipate what will be asked.

Fourth, start to think of the key points that you want to stress in every interview and offer a call-to-action, such as going to your website.  Have something free and interesting available as a download on your site.

Fifth, break the interview down into what it is – a one on-one conversation.  Never mind how many people may watch, listen or read your story -- just think of you talking to one person, one question at a time.

Sixth, boost your confidence by remembering why you started to write books – to help inspire, entertain or elevate others. Feel good about what you’re doing and believe it will go well.

Seventh,  imagine for the moment that you fall on your ass in the interview.  You stutter.  You forget an answer.  Your makeup runs.  Your shirt has a coffee stain.  Your voice cracks.  So what!? What ends up happening? Nothing.  Maybe you didn’t make the best impression or sell a lot of books but you won’t lose friends or go to jail or be fined.  A bad interview is nothing and goes into the rear view mirror when you replace it with good interviews.  Imagine the worse, realize nothing bad results from it, and move on.  Face your fear and walk away unscathed.

Some things can be addressed or even avoided.  For instance, don’t pursue media that may actually try to turn this into a circus, such as morning zoo radio or late night comedy talk shows.  If your topic is controversial – race, religion, politics, sex – ready yourself to hear opposing viewpoints but never lose your cool or treat people disrespectfully.  And if you’re worried about your appearance, fix it up (new clothes) or accept yourself for who you are.  Don’t keep beating yourself up.

Lastly, remember there are endless reels of bloopers of famous, well-trained personalities who messed up royally in their interviews.  The bar is quite high to compete with their screw-ups.  Believe in yourself and others will too, and if the worst happens, move on to the next interview.  

Smile, deep breath…talk.

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Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2017©. Born and raised in Brooklyn, now resides in Westchester. Named one of the best book marketing blogs by Book Baby http://blog.bookbaby.com/2013/09/the-best-book-marketing-blogs